British Journal Study Confirms Organic Produce Significantly Higher in Antioxidants

Eating Green is a single act with a dual purpose, a healthier planet and a healthier you

Consumers are becoming concerned about food, health and safety issues and the social and ecological implications of their purchases. There is a growing distrust of conventional agro-industrial foods and consumers perceive organic products to be a more sustainable system delivering better-tasting, healthier and safer food.

A ten-year study by scientists at U.C. Davis in California found that the level of quercitin, the most common flavonoid in the human diet and the major flavonoid in tomatoes, increased 79 percent as a result of organic management. Also remarkable, the level of kaempferol, a natural antioxidant thought to prevent arteriosclerosis.

According to a report by The Organic Center in Boulder, Colorado, eating organic fruits and vegetables will increase the body’s antioxidant intake by about 30 percent, as compared to conventionally grown produce[1] Continue reading “British Journal Study Confirms Organic Produce Significantly Higher in Antioxidants”

Fight Inflammation With Food Synergy

One of the reasons some studies haven’t shown more impressive results tying disease reduction to the quantity of fruit and vegetable consumption (EPIC Study) may be because of the quality of fruit and vegetable consumption.

People are more likely to eat bananas than blueberries; cucumbers instead of kale. Berries are the healthiest fruits (Best Berries) and greens are The Healthiest Vegetables.

Variety is also important. We know, for example, spinach is healthier than lettuce (#1 Anticancer Vegetable~comparison of salad greens).

A big salad is better than small, but is spring greens mesclun mix a better choice than straight spinach? Is it healthier to eat one apple and one orange than it is to eat three apples or three oranges? Continue reading “Fight Inflammation With Food Synergy”

Top 10 Reasons to Eat Avocados

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Health conscious consumers once shunned avocados for being too high in fat. These days, avocados have been vindicated. Numerous scientific studies suggest eating avocados as an important part of a healthy diet.

No matter how you slice it avocados are not only delicious, they are exceptionally good for you, too!

Health benefits associated with eating avocados:

A Healthy Heart

  • Avocados contain heart-healthy monounsaturated fat like that in olive oil, which actually lowers blood cholesterol. Avocados are also rich in Vitamin E, antioxidants and folate, which can help reduce the risk heart disease dramatically. Continue reading “Top 10 Reasons to Eat Avocados”

Three Easy Steps to Eating Green

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Eating Green is at the heart of the green revolution and can be the most important contribution you can make toward preserving the planet.

Research published in the Journal of Clinical Nutrition shows that vegetarian diets protect the environment, reduce pollution and minimize global warming.¹ Eating a plant-based diet is a healthful triple play with numerous benefits for the planet and its people, our waterways and wildlife.

What could be greener than plants? The average American diet requires the production of an extra ton and a half of greenhouse gases when compared to a vegan diet.²  Both the burning of fossil fuels during food production and the non-carbon dioxide emissions associated with livestock and animal waste, contribute to the problem. Continue reading “Three Easy Steps to Eating Green”

The Skinny on Soy

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Soyfoods are hot – or not – depending on whom you believe. Soy, superstar of healthy alternatives, has been under attack. The Internet is a great resource for news and information about health and science and 87 percent of online users have researched a scientific topic at one time or another.¹ The Internet is also where sensationalistic claims based on half-truths and junk science, are legion.

There’s no denying that the mighty soybean is a nutrition powerhouse, containing high quality protein, complex carbohydrates and a virtual pharmacopeia of phytochemicals credited with the prevention of coronary heart disease, hypertension and many forms of cancer.²

Soyfoods’ appeal was once limited to the counter-culture. In recent years, interest in the health benefits of soy intensified in the research community and the popularity of soyfoods skyrocketed. Continue reading “The Skinny on Soy”

Freedom Gardeners: Homegrown Revolution

final1.jpg In March of this year, First Lady Michelle Obama planted the first White House vegetable garden since the ‘Victory Garden’ days of Eleanor Roosevelt. Edible landscaping is as old as Babylonia and has been cultivated throughout history, often gaining prominence in times of social or economic instability. This type of urban agriculture sprouted up in the 16th and 17th centuries in Europe where the potager or kitchen garden supplied vegetables, herbs and fruit. In WWI they were called Liberty Gardens and subsequently became the Relief Gardens of the Great Depression era. Freedom Gardens, a sort of a Facebook meets Farmer’s Almanac, is a social networking site for homegrown food enthusiasts that launched in May of 2008. Here, novice and expert growers from all over the world gather to post success stories, ask questions and share techniques and ideas that support self-sustained living. Visit OnePayday.com for information on how to raise finances.

Continue reading “Freedom Gardeners: Homegrown Revolution”

Shoppers Guide to Pesticides in Produce

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It’s probably not news to anyone that pesticides have been shown to have carcinogenic and other adverse health effects on humans and that organic produce is the best choice for people and for the planet.

Mounting evidence confirms that many commonly used pesticides can suppress the normal immune system response to invading bacteria, viruses, parasites and tumors.¹ The immune system is the body’s first line of defense and weakening its response can increase the incidence of disease.

A study by the National Cancer Institute identified pesticides as a likely cause of elevated rates of several forms of cancer among farmers². Farmers are at higher risk for certain cancers, such as non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, skin melanomas, multiple myeloma, leukemia, and cancers of the lip, stomach, prostate and brain. Exposures to a number of pesticides have been linked to non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, while exposure to insecticides has been associated with leukemia, multiple myeloma and brain cancer³. Continue reading “Shoppers Guide to Pesticides in Produce”

Chilled Asparagus with Creamy Dill Dressing

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Asparagus is a wonderful spring vegetable with tender fleshy spears that make a lovely distinctive presentation. Long known for its strong diuretic properties, the early Greeks used this delicately flavored vegetable for medicinal purposes, believing that it could prevent bee stings and ease toothaches.

In California, asparagus is picked as early as February, however the season is considered to run from April through May. In the East and Midwest, the growing season extends through the end of July.

Asparagus is very low in calories and sodium, a good source of fiber and an excellent source of natural antioxidants.¹ A cup of asparagus supplies 288 mg of potassium, which is important for brain function, muscle growth and a healthy nervous system. Continue reading “Chilled Asparagus with Creamy Dill Dressing”