Top 10 Foods for Optimal Eye Health

 

Eating the right foods is essential for maintaining healthy eyes. Antioxidants have been credited with preventing illness and anti-aging protection from degenerative disease.

Foods rich in carotenoids, the antioxidant pigment that gives color to produce, have been shown to reduce the risk of macular degeneration, the leading cause of severe vision loss in people over age 60. 1 As a rule, fruits and vegetables with the most color have more antioxidants.

Studies show that a higher dietary intake of lutein and zeaxanthin, carotenoids that often appear together, is related to a reduced risk of cataracts and age-related eye conditions.2 Continue reading “Top 10 Foods for Optimal Eye Health”

Plant Based Diet Promotes Healthy Mood State

 

It has been well documented that people who choose a vegetarian diet enjoy superior health with lower risks for a variety of disorders, such as diabetes, heart disease and cancer.1  Now, science has presented us with yet another reason to choose the healthful vegetarian lifestyle.

A study published in Journal Nutrition has linked the vegetarian lifestyle with healthier mood states.2  It turns out that vegetarians are not only a lot healthier than the rest of the population, apparently, they are a lot happier, too. How does this finding challenge current recommendations?

Vegetarian diets exclude fish, long touted as a major dietary source of omega-3 fats. Omega-3 fatty acids are essential nutrients that cannot be synthesized in the body and must be obtained from dietary sources. Omega-3 fats, in the form of DHA and EPA are critical regulators of brain cell structure and function. Omnivorous diets low in EPA and DHA have been linked to impaired mood states. Continue reading “Plant Based Diet Promotes Healthy Mood State”

The Clear Skin Diet: Six-Week Program for Beautiful Skin

There is a new book on the shelf that promises to clear up acne with dietary intervention in six weeks! The Clear Skin Diet: The Six-Week Program for Beautiful Skin, Hachette Books ©Nina and Randa Nelson, 2018.

Acne is a skin condition that often causes whiteheads, blackheads or pimples on the face, chest, upper back and shoulders. It is the most common skin disorder in the country and while most typical among teenagers, it can affect people of any age.

Nina and Randa Nelson are identical twins who have appeared in numerous commercials, TV shows and music videos since their junior year in high school. These wholesome, beautiful young women working in the entertainment industry both developed cystic acne at the very same time. Continue reading “The Clear Skin Diet: Six-Week Program for Beautiful Skin”

The Truth about Carbs and Weight Gain!

The average American diet, heavy in animal products, requires the production of an extra ton and a half of greenhouse gases compared to a plant based diet.1 A diet rich in whole grains, vegetables, fruit and legumes is environmentally responsible and can help maintain a healthy weight.

In recent years, however many diet books have blamed plant foods, which are high in carbohydrates for the obesity crisis. While the theory persists, health care professionals have advised against low-carbohydrate diets for years.

A  study in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association found that consuming a low-carbohydrate diet (less than 47 percent of calories from carbohydrates) is associated with a greater likelihood of being overweight or obese.2 The July 2009 study found that the lowest risk may be in consuming a diet with 47 to 64 percent of calories from carbohydrates. This was not the first study with these findings.

Continue reading “The Truth about Carbs and Weight Gain!”

Third leading Cause of Death in America is the American Medical System

In my video Why Prevention Is Worth a Ton of Cure, I profiled a paper that added up all the deaths caused by medical care in this country, including the hundred thousand deaths from medication side effects, all deaths caused by errors, etc. The paper’s author concluded that the third leading cause of death in America is the American medical system.

What was the medical community’s reaction to this revelation? After all, the paper was published in one of the most prestigious medical journals, the Journal of the American Medical Association, and authored by one of our most prestigious physicians, Barbara Starfield, who literally wrote the book on primary care. Continue reading “Third leading Cause of Death in America is the American Medical System”

Plant versus Animal Iron… and the winner is…

It is commonly thought that those who eat plant-based diets may be more prone to iron deficiency, but it turns out that they’re no more likely to suffer from iron deficiency anemia than anybody else. This may be because not only do those eating meat-free diets tend to get more fiber, magnesium, and vitamins like A, C, and E, but they also get more iron.

The iron found predominantly in plants is non-heme iron, which isn’t absorbed as well as the heme iron found in blood and muscle, but this may be a good thing. As seen in my video, The Safety of Heme vs. Non-Heme Iron, avoidance of heme iron may be one of the key elements of plant-based protection against metabolic syndrome, and may also be beneficial in lowering the risk from other chronic diseases such as heart disease. Continue reading “Plant versus Animal Iron… and the winner is…”

How Milk May Contribute to Childhood Obesity

 

We’ve known that breastfed infants may be protected against obesity later in life for more than 30 years, but why? It may be the formula.

Giving infants formula based on cow’s milk presents an unusual situation. Cow’s milk is designed to put nearly two pounds a day onto a growing calf, 40 times the growth rate of human infants (see Formula for Childhood Obesity.)

The perfect food for humans, finely tuned over millions of years, is human breast milk. Remarkably, among all mammalian species, the protein content of human milk is the lowest. The excessive protein content of cow’s milk-based formula is thought to be what sets the child up for obesity later in life.

And then, instead of being weaned, we continue to drink milk. The question thus arises, as to whether consumption of a growth-promoting substance from another species throughout childhood fundamentally alters processes of human growth and maturation. Continue reading “How Milk May Contribute to Childhood Obesity”

Are Soyfoods Safe?

 

Soy Bashing has become a cottage industry among a vocal contingent of anti-soy activists who have been spreading rumors about soy for more than a dozen years.

Soybeans are rich in phytoestrogens.

These phytoestrogens, AKA isoflavones have been a theoretical concern at the root of many shocking claims that have been quite distressing to health conscious consumers.

It has been implied that consuming soy adversely affects fertility and encourages feminization in men and boys and sexual abnormalities. Continue reading “Are Soyfoods Safe?”

How Big Food Twists the Science

 

Just like mosquitoes are the vectors of spread for malaria, a landmark article published recently in one of the most prestigious medical journals described large food corporations as the vectors of spread for chronic disease. Unlike “infectious disease epidemics, however, these corporate disease vectors implement sophisticated campaigns to undermine public health interventions.” Most mosquitoes don’t such good PR firms.

A key message was that “alcohol and ultra-processed food and drink industries use similar strategies as the tobacco industry to undermine effective public health policies and programs.” What they mean by ultra-processed are things like burgers, frozen meals, chicken nuggets, fish sticks, potato chips, doughnuts and soda pop.

But how is the food industry like the tobacco industry? Continue reading “How Big Food Twists the Science”

Preventing Alzheimer’s with Lifestyle Changes

It’s safe to say that Alzheimer’s disease research is in a “state of crisis.”

For the past two decades, over 73,000 research articles have been published, yet little clinical progress has been made. The reason a cure may be impossible is because lost cognitive functions in Alzheimer’s disease patients are due to fatally damaged neuronal networks, and dead nerve cells cannot be brought back to life.

Consequently, replacement with new brain cells—even if it were technically possible, cannot be done without creating a new personal identity. One may live, but is it really a cure if their personality is lost forever?

Developing drugs that try to clear out the plaques from advanced degenerated brain tissue therefore makes about as much sense as bulldozing tombstones from graveyards in an attempt to raise the dead. Even if drug companies figured out how to halt further disease progression, many Alzheimer’s victims might not choose to live without being able to recognize family, friends, or themselves in a mirror. Continue reading “Preventing Alzheimer’s with Lifestyle Changes”