Kale, Hearty Green Superfood! Recipe: Torn Kale and Jammin’ Vinaigrette

Torn Kale, Diced Pears, Cranberries and Slivered Almonds with Jammin’ Vinaigrette

Kale has a lively pungent flavor, somewhat like a cross between cabbage and spinach with delicious, peppery notes. This leafy green powerhouse delivers more nutritional value for fewer calories than just about any other food.

One of the best sources of vitamins A, C and K, kale is a very good source of copper, potassium, iron, manganese and phosphorus. Just one cup of cooked kale contains more then 1000 percent of the daily value of vitamin K and more than 150 percent of the daily value for vitamin A and beta-carotene.

Most people are not aware of Vitamin K. Long known for its critical role in blood clotting, vitamin K is also important for forming and maintaining strong bones. 1.  Kale also contains the health-promoting phytonutrients, zeaxanthin and lutein, which promote eye health. 2. Continue reading “Kale, Hearty Green Superfood! Recipe: Torn Kale and Jammin’ Vinaigrette”

Buttery Macadamia Nut Oil… Healthier than Olive Oil?

Baby Spinach Salad with Light and Lovely Cilantro Macadamia Dressing

Healthy oils have a number of benefits associated with them, including heart and circulatory system support, skin health and mental function

Olive oil is heart heathy, due to its high concentration of monounsaturated fats that help maintain healthy cholesterol levels. However, olive oil is not the only heart healthy culinary oil with extraordinary health benefits. Continue reading “Buttery Macadamia Nut Oil… Healthier than Olive Oil?”

Kale, Leafy Green Superfood!

Kale, White Bean and Potato soup

Kale is a cruciferous vegetable and part of the cabbage family. This dark leafy green vegetable is rich in carotenoids and flavonoids, antioxidants shown to reduce the risk of certain types of cancer. Consuming kale provides an abundance of nutrients that support healthy bones, skin, hair and healthy digestion and can also reduce the risk of heart disease.

kale is an excellent source of vitamin K, vitamin C, vitamin A, manganese, and copper.  A very good source of vitamin B6, fiber, calcium, potassium, vitamin E, and vitamin B2, kale is also a good source of iron, magnesium vitamin B1, omega-3 fats, phosphorus, protein, folate, and vitamin B3.  Continue reading “Kale, Leafy Green Superfood!”

The Mediterranean Diet … What’s the Secret?

The Mediterranean Diet is an “in” topic nowadays in both the medical literature and the lay media. What is it? Where did it come from? Why is it good? Merits are rarely detailed; possible downsides are never mentioned.” So, let’s dig in….

After World War II, the government of Greece asked the Rockefeller foundation to come in and assess the situation. Impressed by the low rates of heart disease in the region, nutrition scientist Ancel Keys – after which “K” rations were named – initiated his famous seven countries study.

In this study, he found the rate of fatal heart disease on the Greek isle of Crete was 20 times lower than in the United States. They also had the lowest cancer rates and fewest deaths overall. What were they eating? Continue reading “The Mediterranean Diet … What’s the Secret?”

How Eating Plants May Help Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease

The Intake of saturated fats and added sugars, two of the primary components of a modern Western diet is linked to the development of Alzheimer’s disease.

Plant-derived foods contain thousands of compounds with antioxidant properties, some of which can traverse the blood-brain barrier and may have neuroprotective effects by assisting with antioxidant defense.

The concept of “brain rust” is that neurodegenerative diseases arise from excess oxidative stress. Nature has gifted humankind with a plethora of plants, fruits, vegetables and nuts, and the diverse array of bioactive nutrients present in these natural products may play a pivotal role in prevention and one day, perhaps, even the cure of various neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease.

Evidence suggests that naturally occurring plant compounds may potentially hinder neurodegeneration, and even improve memory and cognitive function. Continue reading “How Eating Plants May Help Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease”

Are Microgreens Healthier?

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) recently published a study assessing the nutrition content of 25 commercially available microgreens, seedlings of vegetables and herbs that have gained popularity in upscale markets and restaurants.[1]

Just a few inches tall, these microgreens boast intense flavors and vivid colors, but what about their nutritional content? No one knew until now.

For instance, we’ve known for quite some time that baby spinach leaves have higher levels of phytonutrients than mature spinach leaves.[2] What about really baby spinach that may be just a week or two old? Continue reading “Are Microgreens Healthier?”

Kale, The Queen of Greens

Kale is a leafy green powerhouse that delivers more nutritional value for fewer calories than just about any other food. Thought to have originated in Asia, kale has been cultivated for more than 2000 years and was introduced to Europe around 600 B.C.

Kale has a lively pungent flavor, somewhat like a cross between cabbage and spinach with delicious, peppery notes. A great addition to soup or a sauté, kale can be braised, baked, marinated or blended into a green smoothie.

This richly colored leafy green vegetable can be red, black, purple or green. Curly kale is sweet and mild with ruffled leaves and a fibrous stalk and the most common type found in the produce section.

One of the best sources of vitamins A, C and K, kale is a very good source of copper, potassium, iron, manganese and phosphorus. Just one cup of cooked kale contains more then 1000 percent of the daily value of vitamin K and more than 150 percent of the daily value for vitamin A and beta-carotene. Continue reading “Kale, The Queen of Greens”

Scrumptious Superfood Smoothie

Superfoods are, by definition nutrient dense and calorie sparse. Flax seeds are a bona fide superfood and may look tiny, but they are potent! Flax is an ancient plant and the best plant-based source of omega 3 fatty acids on the planet.

Studies have shown many diverse health benefits associated with omega-3s like reducing the risk of heart disease[1] [2]and stroke and flax contains both soluble and insoluble fiber. Great for the heart – Good for digestion!

Flax is very rich in phytoestrogens called lignans, which have been shown in numerous studies, to block hormone-dependent cancers, such as breast[3] and prostate cancer[4]. Continue reading “Scrumptious Superfood Smoothie”

Optimum Nutrition

In my NutritionFacts.org videos, Golden glow and Produce, not pills to increase physical attractiveness, I review new research suggesting that consuming dark green leafy vegetables will improve healthy appearance of Caucasians,* because of the deposit of carotenoids in the skin.

Taking those same phytonutrients in pill form, however doesn’t work. We should strive to get most of our nutrients from plants, not pills. The balance of scientific evidence suggests that the healthiest way to eat is a vitamin B12-fortified diet of whole plant foods.

For optimum nutrition, we should be sure to include in our daily diet not only an array of whole grains, beans, nuts, seeds, fruit, and as many vegetables as we can eat, but also specifically dark green leafy vegetables, berries, and white (or green) tea.

Attention should also be paid to these nutrients: Continue reading “Optimum Nutrition”

Southern Greens and Vegan Sausage

Leafy green vegetables are nutrition all-stars and an excellent source of minerals, such as iron, calcium, potassium and magnesium as well as vitamins K, C, E and many B vitamins.

Leafy green vegetables are also rich in a variety of phytonutrients including beta-carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin. Among many other healthful benefits, these organic compounds protect the body’s cells from damage and the eyes from age related disorders. Continue reading “Southern Greens and Vegan Sausage”